Topics › Pygame

Solar system evolution

After running my solar system simulation several times I was interested to see how robust the system was. By this I mean that despite the fact that the particles start off randomly distributed, the progress of the simulation is quite similar each time. The details weren't exactly the same each times, but in general, a star formed at the centre of the universe at about the same time and ended up with a few satellites, while several particles were sent flying off into space.

Solar system simulation

[UPDATE: I've made a 3D version of this simulation using the Khan Academy programming environment.]

Macrophage chemotaxis

I updated my macrophage simulation to use my Python particle module, which I describe here. I was pleased how straight forward it was to effectively re-create my previous simulation from scratch using a few simple commands. There are a few changes I'd like to make so creating new simulations will be even quicker in future.

Project:

Science Simulation

Various simulations of experimental techniques that I hope to use on simulated cells. I'd like to combine them with a virtual lab book to make a game.

Project:

Pygame physics simulation (Tutorial)

A tutorial explaining how to use the Python module, Pygame, and some basic trigonometry to create a physics simulation.

Evolving arthropods

Fractal Arthropod

Recently, while searching for an picture of evolution (specifically, the famous image of the progression from ape to man), I came across an interesting and beautiful evolution simulation. The website is actually about a piece of software called Nodebox that uses Python to draw and manipulate images. The site has loads of amazing examples of its power. Sadly, I don’t have a Mac, so I can’t use the software myself. However, since I’ve been learning create SVG files with Python, I thought I create my own simple version.

Project:

Evolving Images

A genetic algorithm that uses overlapping transparent circles to approximate an image. Includes analysis of the effect of altering mutation rate and population size.

Macrophage simulation

While discussing some of my programming projects in the pub, I mentioned using biological approaches to creating a Artificial Intelligence to play Go. I was initially thinking of evolving solutions, but the conversation gradually moved into a biological analogy for Go: two teams of macrophages, one black, one white, trying to engulf one another.